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  Click here to go to the first staff post in this thread.   Thread: So, what's everybody reading these days?

  1.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #81
    Technical Director John's Avatar
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    I really love both A Deepness In The Sky, and Fire Upon the Deep. I have a lot of respect for Verner Vinge -- I met him at GDC one year after a keynote he gave, and that I thoroughly enjoyed.

    Quote Originally Posted by balnoisi View Post
    after many years of not reading "genre" fiction, i want to go back to scifi. so i'm starting to read "a deepness in the sky" by vernor vinge. looks promising !

  2. #82
    Senior Member sweetjer's Avatar
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    maybe I should give the prequel another shot... I just get frustrated when a published work hasn't been properly edited. the first one is one of my favorite science fiction novels, so I really should be more tolerant of the errors. I'd say he's earned that. Also he sort of looks like my dad.

    Back to PKD: Read Ubik.

  3. #83
    Junior Member Alazavrus's Avatar
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    I want to practice/improve my German now, so currently I'm trying to read Zelazny's Amber Chronicles (in German). It ain't going terribly well, though, I might go back to reading Revelation Space series by Alastair Reynolds.

  4. #84
    I read "The Dragon Reborn" by Robert Jordan at the moment. That is 3rd book from "The Wheel of Time" cycle. It's one of favorite, I think.

  5. #85
    Factions veteran stoicmom's Avatar
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    You won't believe this, but I just finished Tolkien's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings (books 1, 2, 3) Just a little behind in life, but what an adventure

  6. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by stoicmom View Post
    You won't believe this, but I just finished Tolkien's The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings (books 1, 2, 3) Just a little behind in life, but what an adventure
    It's never too late to read the lord of the rings . Glad you enjoyed them!

  7. #87
    I'm currently re-reading my extensive collection of Stanislaw Lem's books. He really is an incredible sci-fi author. Clifford Simak is great, too.
    "Villain, I have done thy mother." (c) Titus Andronicus, Act IV, Scene II

  8. #88
    Quote Originally Posted by CottonWolf View Post
    I've just finished the first book of A Dance with Dragons (the paperback was released in two parts in the UK), and I'm moving on to re-read Norwegian Wood by Haruki Murakami.

    Murakami is a genius. If you haven't already, I strongly recommend reading Kafka on the Shore. It's wonderfully surreal. Though I always wonder if the translations read in any way the same as the way he originally wrote it in Japanese...
    Murakami is my favourite author, and Norwegian Wood is one of my favourite books

    Quote Originally Posted by Dark Jedi Dave View Post
    With the Shadowrun revival, I've been reading the Shadowrun: 20th Anniversary Core Rulebook and trying to get a group to play. Also, bought a new homebrewing book (beer) simply called How To Brew, its the best one I've read yet =)
    How to brew is great, I highly reccomend also checking out a book John Palmer wrote in collaboration with Jamil Zainasheff called 'brewing classic styles' , it has like 80 recipes, all of them have won an award at some point or another.

    As for me, I haven't spent nearly as much time reading as I would like lately, and as soon school starts back up it will be all text books and journals. When I do get the time I've been going between 'I am a cat' by Soseki Natsume, and a book about the differing levels of development faced by different societies by Jared Diamond called 'Guns, Germs and Steel'. In my to read pile is '1Q84' by Murakami and 'Horns' by Joe Hill. Books for me are like games, so many unfinished, so little time...

  9. #89
    Superbacker StandSure's Avatar
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    I am reading Neal Stephenson's "Reamde" right now...really good, I was turned on to it by this board. I loved Snowcrash and Diamond Age but really hated his Baroque Cycle...I found the first book ponderous and dull. I'm glad he got back into more of his early style.

    I read a book last year that I think some of the people here would enjoy: "Ready Player One" by Ernest Cline. A really fun read, especially for someone who grew up in the '80s and loves games or pop culture. Highly recommend.

  10. #90
    Junior Member caine1138's Avatar
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    The Butlerian Jihad, prequel for the Dune series of the movies.
    Prior to that was Song of the Black Sword, the original series of books that Elric starred in.
    Runes from the Web...

  11. #91
    Backer Morte's Avatar
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    Man's Search for Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl

    Frankls experiences as an Auschwitz concentration camp inmate during WW II.

  12. #92
    Skald Aleonymous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Trinkendkopf View Post
    I read "The Dragon Reborn" by Robert Jordan at the moment. That is 3rd book from "The Wheel of Time" cycle. It's one of favorite, I think.
    For about 25 months now, I am reading "The Wheel of Time" series, by Robert Jordan.

    It takes place in an epic/high-fantasy (a.k.a. "Tolkien-esque") themed world, with magic, swords, meanies and all the necessary ingredients! It features a very large cast of characters and intricate relationships (politics and all), in a scale similar to G.R.R. Martin's "A Song of Ice and Fire" series (which is, however, dark/low-fantasy themed). I am currently at book #9, of the strenuous series of 14 books (!). Jordan died before finishing the series and Brandon Sanderson was chosen to complete the last four books, based on detailed notes left by Jordan. It's a little hard & slow at first, but once all characters have been shaped, it starts 'rolling'
    Last edited by Aleonymous; 04-05-2014 at 04:48 AM.
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  13.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #93
    Technical Director John's Avatar
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    Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse
    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, by Frederick Douglass

  14. #94
    Backer Rymdkejsaren's Avatar
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    Going through a Stephen King stint both re-reading older novels I read when I was way too young (just finished The Shining) and now reading 11/22/63. I am also readinghis book On Writing, which I find refreshing, down to earth and can heartily recommend to anyone interested in improving their writing skills.

    Recently I finished the Otherland series by Tad Williams which is amazing, and I am also reading Ursula LeGuin's Earthsea books which is a fantasy classic that I have missed out on.
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  15. #95
    Skald Aleonymous's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rymdkejsaren View Post
    ...I am also reading Ursula LeGuin's Earthsea books which is a fantasy classic...
    I recommend 'em too.
    Together we stand, divided we fall.

  16.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #96
    Technical Director John's Avatar
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    Just finished up my previous 2.

    Steppenwolf by Herman Hesse
    Another great read from Hesse. The treatise describing the bourgeois and Harry's relationship to it was spot on.

    Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, by Frederick Douglass
    Reads like an adventure story, while also serving as a severe reprimand of the failed morality of a society, and providing hope for the future. After you finish the book, there is an appendix in which Douglass delivers a sublime verbal punishment to the hypocritical so-called religious folks who allow, propagate, and profit by the institution of slavery.

    I'm now reading Starting Point: 1979-1996 by Hayao Miyazaki tonight.

  17. #97
    I am currently reading "The broken Jug" by Kleist, digging my way through "renowned" literature. It's a comedy and quite short, but so far i would not recommend it.

    John, if you are into Hermann Hesse, I do highly recommend Siddharhta (as long as you havent read it already!) It's an impressive biographical parabel, establishing new perceptions of various kinds. (For me especially concering the overall pace of life and the process of learning)

    @Alazavrus: Do you know Leonce & Lena by Georg Büchner? It's a really short one (max. 30 pages?) and a ride of fun to read, not a complicated use of language either!

  18. #98
    Superbacker StandSure's Avatar
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    I read Siddhartha as part of a German class in college and loved it. My favorite of Hesse's.

    Currently I am reading "S.", the concept book by J.J. Abrams. It's a difficult and slow read because of the layered way it is constructed. I had to give up on reading all the layers at once and read just the novel first; now I'm going back through the extras. To be honest, for me it comes off as too "constructed" and more work than I normally am looking for in a book I would read for enjoyment. I feel obliged to get through all of it, as I received it as a gift, but, I wouldn't really recommend it.

    Next up I will go back to The Wheel of Time; I'm at Lord of Chaos.
    Let the Sleeping Dog Lie!

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  19.   Click here to go to the next staff post in this thread.   #99
    Technical Director John's Avatar
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    Aye, Siddhartha is one of my favorite books of all time. It had a great impact on me. I was also really impressed with Narcissus and Goldmund, also by Hesse.

    Did you know that the song by Yes, "Close to the Edge", is based on Siddhartha? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Close_t...ge_(Yes_album)

    Also, there is a movie version of Steppenwolf that contains a great animated sequence: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwDGVP1tMTg

  20. #100
    No, I didn't know that. Thank you for sharing! The animated sequence is great indeed!

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